Pain Relief Services

Dr.Ricardo Alvarado, MD

Pain Relief Services

Watch Our Videos To Learn More

Watch Our Videos To Learn More

Thoracic & Lumbar Procedure
A cervical, thoracic or lumbar facet joint injection involves injecting a small amount of local anesthetic (numbing agent) and/or steroid medication, which can anesthetize the facet joints and block the pain. The pain relief from a facet joint injection is intended to help a patient better tolerate a physical therapy routine to rehabilitate his or her injury or back condition.

Facet joint injections usually have two goals: to help diagnose the cause and location of pain and also to provide pain relief:

  • Diagnostic goals: By placing numbing medicine into the facet joint, the amount of immediate pain relief experienced by the patient will help determine if the facet joint is a source of pain. If complete pain relief is achieved while the facet joint is numb, it means that joint is likely a source of pain.
  • Pain relief goals: Along with the numbing medication, a facet joint injection also includes injecting time-release steroid (cortisone) into the facet joint to reduce inflammation, which can sometimes provide longer-term pain relief.

The injection procedure may also be called a facet block, as its purpose is to block the pain.

 

Dekompressor Discectomy
A Dekompressor Discectomy is a minimally invasive procedure used to treat pain caused when a lumbar disc wall is affected by an expanding nucleus. The expanding of the nucleus creates pressure on the nerves causing pain in lower back and/or legs. A Dekompressor Discectomy consists of first using local anesthetic to numb the site. Then a thin needle is injected to the disk. Finally the excess nucleus material is removed. This will relieve the painful pressure. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

Facet joint injections usually have two goals: to help diagnose the cause and location of pain and also to provide pain relief:

  • Diagnostic goals: By placing numbing medicine into the facet joint, the amount of immediate pain relief experienced by the patient will help determine if the facet joint is a source of pain. If complete pain relief is achieved while the facet joint is numb, it means that joint is likely a source of pain.
  • Pain relief goals: Along with the numbing medication, a facet joint injection also includes injecting time-release steroid (cortisone) into the facet joint to reduce inflammation, which can sometimes provide longer-term pain relief.

The injection procedure may also be called a facet block, as its purpose is to block the pain.

 

Discograms/Discography
Discography is a diagnostic procedure used to determine one or more of your discs as the source of your back pain. Also known as a Discogram, Discography is used in cases where disabling pain is experienced by a patient who has already undergone a vast conservative treatment. First, a local anesthetic numbs the injection site. Then, a fluoroscope is used to place the needle to the edge of the disc (this can be repeated for one or more discs). Finally, the discs are injected with contrast dye one at a time to determine which are the diseased. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

Facet joint injections usually have two goals: to help diagnose the cause and location of pain and also to provide pain relief:

  • Diagnostic goals: By placing numbing medicine into the facet joint, the amount of immediate pain relief experienced by the patient will help determine if the facet joint is a source of pain. If complete pain relief is achieved while the facet joint is numb, it means that joint is likely a source of pain.
  • Pain relief goals: Along with the numbing medication, a facet joint injection also includes injecting time-release steroid (cortisone) into the facet joint to reduce inflammation, which can sometimes provide longer-term pain relief.

The injection procedure may also be called a facet block, as its purpose is to block the pain.

 

Intrathecal Drug Delivery System (Pain Pump)
Through drug delivery therapy many patients are able to reduce oral/systematic pain medication while also reducing severe chronic pain. The implanted pump, along with the catheter are placed under your skin through a surgical procedure. Though the pain may not be eliminated completely, it does bring significant relief and comfort in order to improve function. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged.

http://www.medtronic.com/patients/chronic-pain/device/drug-pumps/benefits-risks/

Facet joint injections usually have two goals: to help diagnose the cause and location of pain and also to provide pain relief:

  • Diagnostic goals: By placing numbing medicine into the facet joint, the amount of immediate pain relief experienced by the patient will help determine if the facet joint is a source of pain. If complete pain relief is achieved while the facet joint is numb, it means that joint is likely a source of pain.
  • Pain relief goals: Along with the numbing medication, a facet joint injection also includes injecting time-release steroid (cortisone) into the facet joint to reduce inflammation, which can sometimes provide longer-term pain relief.

The injection procedure may also be called a facet block, as its purpose is to block the pain.

 

Lumbar Sympathetic Block
A Lumbar Sympathetic Block is used to relieve lower back and/or leg pain. The procedure consists of a series of injections. First a local anesthetic numbs the injection site to the sympathetic nerves. Then contrast dye is used in combination with a fluoroscope to identify the location of the needle in the painful areas. Finally treatment is injected around the sympathetic nerves to block pain signals, improving leg pain. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

http://www.medtronic.com/patients/chronic-pain/device/drug-pumps/benefits-risks/

Facet joint injections usually have two goals: to help diagnose the cause and location of pain and also to provide pain relief:

  • Diagnostic goals: By placing numbing medicine into the facet joint, the amount of immediate pain relief experienced by the patient will help determine if the facet joint is a source of pain. If complete pain relief is achieved while the facet joint is numb, it means that joint is likely a source of pain.
  • Pain relief goals: Along with the numbing medication, a facet joint injection also includes injecting time-release steroid (cortisone) into the facet joint to reduce inflammation, which can sometimes provide longer-term pain relief.

The injection procedure may also be called a facet block, as its purpose is to block the pain.

 

Mild® Procedure
mild® is a procedure used for those diagnosed with LSS (lumbar spinal stenosis) It is a minimally invasive outpatient procedure performed by a mild®  certified doctor. Using an imaging machine, excess ligament tissue and small pieces of bone are removed through a small incision in your back. This can reduce pain and restore mobility. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

http://www.medtronic.com/patients/chronic-pain/device/drug-pumps/benefits-risks/

Facet joint injections usually have two goals: to help diagnose the cause and location of pain and also to provide pain relief:

  • Diagnostic goals: By placing numbing medicine into the facet joint, the amount of immediate pain relief experienced by the patient will help determine if the facet joint is a source of pain. If complete pain relief is achieved while the facet joint is numb, it means that joint is likely a source of pain.
  • Pain relief goals: Along with the numbing medication, a facet joint injection also includes injecting time-release steroid (cortisone) into the facet joint to reduce inflammation, which can sometimes provide longer-term pain relief.

The injection procedure may also be called a facet block, as its purpose is to block the pain.

 

Percutaneous Disc Nucleoplasty

Nucleoplasty overview

  • Nucleoplasty (also known as percutaneous discectomy) treats pain caused by herniated discs.
  • A specially trained radiologist, using image guidance, removes a small amount of disc tissue to relieve pressure on the nerves.
  • The treatment can reduce pain and restore mobility.
  • Nucleoplasty is a “minimally invasive” procedure, which means a smaller incision, fewer risks of complication, and less recovery time than traditional surgery.
  • We pay special attention to minimizing radiation exposure—without giving up image quality.
  • Our state-of-the-art imaging technology plays a key role in planning and performing each procedure, and on-staff physicists and engineers ensure that our machines remain in top condition.

Nucleoplasty in depth

What is a herniated disc?

The discs function as shock absorbers between the vertebra of the spine. A herniated disc has a defect or weakness in the wall, similar to a “blister” in the sidewall of a tire, which can lead to pressure on sensitive nerve roots and pain receptors in the back.

Treatment

Specialty expertiseNucleoplasty, also known as percutaneous discectomy, is a minimally invasive procedure for treating patients who are suffering from low back and leg pain caused by a herniated disc. It involves removing tissue from the disc to relieve pressure on the affected nerve.

The interventional radiologists who perform procedures at Mass General Imaging arespecialists in the area of the body and the condition under treatment, as well as the procedure itself. In addition to the training that all radiologists receive, these specialists have additional education, plus extensive real-world experience. In many cases, our doctors helped to pioneer many of the interventional treatments that we offer.

Coordinated care

Our team of interventional radiologists and nurse practitioners coordinates a patient’s complete care—from imaging evaluation to post-procedure followup—maintaining a high level of communication with the patient throughout the process. In addition, Mass General Imaging works in close coordination with experts from across Mass General when necessary.

When should I consider nucleoplasty?

Candidates for nucleoplasty include men and women who have chronic back pain (at least six weeks) and debilitation due to disc herniation. Patients often have limited mobility and cannot perform routine daily activities, such as bathing, dressing and walking. Nucleoplasty is usually performed after conservative treatments (bed rest, back brace, oral pain medications) have failed. Most patients are elderly (average age 70 years), but younger patients with osteoporosis, due to metabolic disorders or long-term steroid treatment, may also benefit from nucleoplasty.

What should I expect BEFORE nucleoplasty?

All patients will be evaluated by one of our staff prior to nucleoplasty. Sometimes a telephone interview is sufficient, but usually you will be seen in person. The evaluation includes a directed history and physical examination and blood tests. Physicians also need to perform an imaging study prior to treatment to corroborate these findings.

At our initial evaluation, you should bring any imaging studies that were not performed at Massachusetts General Hospital. It is essential that you have recent plain radiographs and MRI. If MRI cannot be performed (due to a cardiac pacemaker, for example), CT scan is necessary. Some patients may need examination under fluoroscopy or bone scan.

What should I expect DURING nucleoplasty?

Nucleoplasty takes about an hour to perform. You will be given both a sedative to relax you and local anesthesia. Using live images, the interventional radiologist will place a needle into the disc, followed by a catheter. The doctor will then treat the disc, using either radio waves or heat to reduce the size of the disc and therefore relieve the pressure of the disc on the spinal nerve. Patients will experience relief as pressure is taken off the affected nerve, with published success rates greater than 80%.

What should I expect AFTER nucleoplasty?

After nucleoplasty, pain or weakness can be caused by a disc herniation pushing on a spinal nerve. You will be kept in the hospital for several hours of observation. You will be discharged with instructions to gradually re-establish normal activity over the next few days.

http://www.medtronic.com/patients/chronic-pain/device/drug-pumps/benefits-risks/

Facet joint injections usually have two goals: to help diagnose the cause and location of pain and also to provide pain relief:

  • Diagnostic goals: By placing numbing medicine into the facet joint, the amount of immediate pain relief experienced by the patient will help determine if the facet joint is a source of pain. If complete pain relief is achieved while the facet joint is numb, it means that joint is likely a source of pain.
  • Pain relief goals: Along with the numbing medication, a facet joint injection also includes injecting time-release steroid (cortisone) into the facet joint to reduce inflammation, which can sometimes provide longer-term pain relief.

The injection procedure may also be called a facet block, as its purpose is to block the pain.

 

Percutaneous Disc Decompression For Pain
Percutaneous Disc Decompression is a minimally invasive outpatient procedure. This procedure consists of removing disc nucleus through a needle. This will reduce pressure on the nerve root, which in turn will alleviate low back and lower extremity pain. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.
Cervical Procedures For Pain Relief
A cervical, thoracic or lumbar facet joint injection involves injecting a small amount of local anesthetic (numbing agent) and/or steroid medication, which can anesthetize the facet joints and block the pain. The pain relief from a facet joint injection is intended to help a patient better tolerate a physical therapy routine to rehabilitate his or her injury or back condition.

Facet joint injections usually have two goals: to help diagnose the cause and location of pain and also to provide pain relief:

  • Diagnostic goals: By placing numbing medicine into the facet joint, the amount of immediate pain relief experienced by the patient will help determine if the facet joint is a source of pain. If complete pain relief is achieved while the facet joint is numb, it means that joint is likely a source of pain.
  • Pain relief goals: Along with the numbing medication, a facet joint injection also includes injecting time-release steroid (cortisone) into the facet joint to reduce inflammation, which can sometimes provide longer-term pain relief.

The injection procedure may also be called a facet block, as its purpose is to block the pain.

Celiac Plexus Block
Celiac plexus is a network of nerves part of its function is to transmit pain signals from the pancreas. A Celiac Plexus Block is an out patient procedure; it is usually used as part of the treatment for Chronic Pancreatitis and other Chronic Abdominal Pain. First a needle is inserted in the spine to either target the Celiac plexus or the splanchnic nerves (which lead from the spine to the celiac plexus). Then the treatment is administered to deactivate nerves. This blocks the celiac plexus nerves that go various parts of the abdomen; this can reduce pain in the abdominal area. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.
Diagnostic Medial Branch Nerve Injections
The Diagnostic Branch Blocks is an outpatient procedure used to diagnose pain in the facet joint. Facet joints are located between the vertebrae, they allow motion and provide stability. First, a local anesthetic numbs the injection site. Then, contrast dye is used to ensure proper placement in the Medial Branch Nerve. Finally, an anesthetic is injected on the targeted nerve. If immediate pain relief is experienced after the injection, the patient could be a candidate for another procedure that can provide results over a longer period of time. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.
Hypogastric Plexus Block
The hypogastric plexus is a network of nerves around the bottom of your spinal cord. A Hypogastric Plexus Block can help you stop feeling pain in your pelvis. First, lying on your back, a local anesthetic numbs the injection site. Then, contrast dye is used to ensure proper placement of two needles near your hipbone. Finally, the medication including the treatment to block the nerves is injected. This can reduce the pain in uterus and ovary area for women, prostate and testicular area for men, as well as the pain around lower intestines and bladder. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.
Neuromodulation
Neuromodulation encompasses a variable definition in both its entity and activity. It can include treatments that involve the stimulation of various nerves in the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, autonomic nervous system, or deep cell nuclei of the brain that lead to the “modulation” of its activity. By definition, neuromodulation is a therapeutic alteration of activity either through stimulation or medication, both of which are introduced by implanted devices.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Peripheral Nerve Blocks
A combination of local anesthetic (such as lidocaine), epinephrine, a steroid (corticosteroid) and an opioid is often used. Epinephrine produces constriction of the blood vessels which delays the diffusion of the anesthetic. Steroids can help to reduce inflammation. Opioids are painkillers. These blocks can be either single treatments, multiple injections over a period of time, or continuous infusions. A continuous peripheral nerve block can be introduced into a limb undergoing surgery – for example, a femoral nerve block to prevent pain in knee replacement.

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Transforaminal Injections
Transforaminal Injections are used to treat back and leg pain due to a herniated disc and/or nerve pressure. The procedure consists of injecting medicine in the neural foramina space in one of the lumbar intervertebral levels. First a local anesthetic numbs the injection site. Then contrast dye is used to ensure proper placement in the epidural space. Finally the treatment, which typically consists of corticosteroids and anti-inflammatory, is injected. These long acting steroids can reduce swelling as well as inflammation of the spinal nerve roots and surrounding areas. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Facet Joint Injections
Facet joints are located between the vertebrae, they allow motion and provide stability. Facet Joint Injections serve a dual purpose, they diagnose the source of your pain is coming from Facet Syndrome; additionally it provides therapeutic effects. First a local anesthetic numbs the injection site. Then contrast dye is used to ensure proper placement in the facet joint. Finally the anesthetic and anti-inflammatory medication is slowly injected into the joint. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Botox and Myobloc Injections for pain
BOTOX® and MYOBLOC® are neurotoxins or muscle-relaxing drugs. They are injected into selected muscle fibers in low quantities, which not enter the blood stream. This blocks the signals to your muscles greatly reducing or preventing muscle spasms. These results can last up to six months. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

 

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Gassarian Ganglion Blockade
Gasserian ganglion is important in the treatment of some types of facial pain. It is possible to relieve pain by blocking the Gasserian ganglion. The Gasserian ganglion is found inside the skull next to the brainstem. First an electrical current is applied to the Gasserian ganglion via a needle that heats the ganglion. This stops it from passing pain signals. Since only the thin nerves in this ganglion are blocked, the remaining function of the ganglion remains intact. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

 

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Piriformis Steroid Injections
The piriformis muscle of your buttock attaches to the side of the sacrum, which is the side, flat bone at the base of your spine just above your tailbone. It rotates the leg outward and helps to hold the hip in joint when it is bearing weight. First, local anesthetic is administered. Then the doctor will insert the needle into the piriformis muscle. A small electric current will pass through this needle into the muscle. This will help the doctor the most painful spot. The doctor will then inject the steroid and anesthetic into this area. This will reduce inflammation and swelling around the nerves that pass through the piriformis muscle. This in turn can reduce your pain, numbness and tingling. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

 

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Scar Neuroma Injections
A neuroma injection is used to reduce pain in the foot, mainly in and around the joints of the toes. This is typically caused by degeneration or fibrosis in the digital nerve. An injection of local anesthetic mixed with cortisone is injected in the area. This breaks-up and thins the scar tissue envelope around the nerve and reduces inflammation. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

 

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Stem Cell Injections for Pain
Stem cells are responsible for healing us. However, we sometimes cannot get enough of these healing cells into the injured area. In stem cell injections assistance in the healing of damaged tissue, tendons, ligaments, cartilage and bone is provided by harvesting the patient’s own cells and then injecting them directly into the area needed, decreasing downtime and avoiding painful rehabilitation period.  Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

 

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

RACZ Caudal Neurolysis
RACZ Caudal Neurolysis is an out patient procedure used to treat pain in the lower back and leg. First a local anesthetic numbs the tissue around sacral hiatus. Then contrast dye is used to ensure proper placement in the epidural space and to see the scared areas through a fluoroscope. Finally is administered through a catheter (which is inserted through the needle) to dissolve scar tissue and alleviate pain. In order to further reduce scar tissue the treatment may be repeated. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.
All Joint and Bursa Injections
Joint injections usually are performed after administering local anesthesia. The joint is entered with a needle attached to a syringe. At this point, either joint fluid can be obtained and used for laboratory testing or medications can be injected into the joint. This technique also applies to injections into a bursa or tendon sheath to treat bursitis and tendonitis. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

Epidural Steroid Injection for Pain
Epidural Steroid injections are a non-surgical procedure vital in the management of leg or lower back pain. First, a local anesthetic numbs the injection site. Then, contrast dye is used to ensure proper placement in the epidural space. Finally, the injection, which typically consists of corticosteroids and anti-inflammatory, is administered. In some cases the injection on its own can provide relief; however, in combination with rehabilitation program an Epidural Steroid injection can have additional advantages. Discussing the benefits and risks with your doctor is strongly encouraged; results vary on a case-to-case basis.

Local anesthetic nerve blocks are sterile procedures that are usually performed in an outpatient facility or hospital. The procedure can be performed with the help of ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a live X-ray) or CT to guide the physician in the placement of the needle. A probe positioning system can be used to hold the ultrasound transducer steady. Electrical stimulation can provide feedback on the proximity of the needle to the target nerve.

The idea and allure of neuromodulation stems from its initial direction of a reversible alteration of the nervous system. It is the idea of neural “modulation” as supposed to “ablative” or resective procedures. Treatments are reversible and have the ability to be turned off in most situations.

Implanted devices are usually neural stimulators and drug delivery devices such as pumps. The world of neuromodulation encompasses acute and chronic pain syndromes, movement disorders, dystonia and spasticity, as well as epilepsy. An emerging subset of neuromodulation includes neuroprosthetics for either nerve regeneration or rehab potential.

The neuromodulation community is based on a multidisciplinary approach that is diverse in its delivery. It involves physicians, industry, and basic science researchers. Clinicians involved in the procedures vary from neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, pain specialists, and rehab physicians. Those involved in the multidisciplinary approach can include neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians, and physical therapy.

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